09092011doom

My professor brought up an interesting topic today. He was talking about the media’s effect on people, the cultivation theory and how through several examples, such as the mean world effect and the CSI effect, TV has started to have a long term impact on people.

To clarify, cultivation theory discusses the advertisements we watch on TV and the effect they have on people over long term exposure. According to this theory, this will ultimately change  our understanding of the world. This has been scientifically documented through studies and I gave a few examples of such.

The mean world effect is when people see alot of crime and violence on TV and they think that that is what reality is like. These people are more fearful, are more likely to own a gun for protection and so on. Over the past ten years violent crime rates have gone down 5-10% whereas coverage of violent crime has gone up 700%.

The CSI effect is when due to the TV show people have a higher demand for forensic evidence in cases or else they are less likely to find a person guilty.

Advertisements are another good example of warping societies perceptions. An example is advertisments attacking one’s self esteem and doctoring up an unrealistic image to conform to. Then we have things like woman’s body issues to contend with.

There have been studies and tests over time to figure all these things out.  We know that in the short and long term TV can have an impact. What hasn’t been explored is the impact video games have on people. Now, some people try and fly the flag of omnipotence. As one of my favourite sayings go, “seek out those who are searching for the truth and run from those that say they’ve found it.” So far what I’ve seen in studies and through my own personal experience, both from myself and others, I can’t see it.

What I found interesting was the idea of militainment. Those in the ivory tower are worried that it makes people more accepting of violence; that it is seen as something normal in society. Needless to say, if that is the case, it’s a real problem.

I want to hear your opinions on the matter. What do you think?

Do you agree with the concern about militainment?

Do you think video games create a higher propensity of violence among youth today?

If you could just add in a little bit about yourself or somebody you’re talking about- background, how long they’ve been playing an so on, that would be appreciated. I’m looking forward to hearing from you!

  1. teamliftrequired says:

    This would be a valid point if a sporadic and choppy article structure actually did keep the reader’s attention. However, if this mini-paragraph technique is used over zealously does it not provide the opposite affect? surely you must concede this point Mr.ProfessorofMLAformat. Also i merely wished to point out that some individual thoughts in the article would have been pleasant instead of the random theories thrown around in the article with no evidence to support them. Oh and btw how much time did you spend spell and grammar checking your comment hahaha.

    • No time at all. I write well. I proof-read everything I write, comments included. I’m a Grammar Nazi and actually get frustrated at myself when I make mistakes, therefore I tend to make less of them.

      Perhaps the mini-paragraphs are somewhat overused in this article in particular, however I have no qualms with someone not being able to keep their attention on something with spaces in, just with people who criticise other’s grammar, spelling and writing style when their own is terrible.

      As to the content of the article, sure. He could have written more on his own opinion. It is, in fact, encouraged of our writers. However saying “i merely wished to point out that some individual thoughts in the article” is slightly more constructive than saying “i find your entire article is full of shit and painful to read”.

      I am still of the opinion however, that the internet should have an entrance exam to make sure people can use the correct versions of their, they’re, there, affect and effect.

      Although, compared to some of the comments we’ve got on this site you’ve actually written yours quite well… (See, http://www.gamejudgment.com/die-call-of-duty-die-ive-had-enough-of-the-same-game)

  2. nicholas says:

    A good example for how video games affect military recruitment.

    http://terminallance.com/2010/02/12/terminal-lance-12-tom-clancy-is-full-of-shit/

  3. Nicholas says:

    Glad you enjoyed the article. The point of the article wasn’t to try and prove whether or not video games make us violent, that was the question posed. I was showing that there is a significant impact from TV on us to make the idea plausible.

  4. teamliftrequired says:

    Frankly i find your entire article is full of shit and painful to read. It is written in an absolutely juvenile fashion and it is hardly surprising that the only proof you have of this video games make people violent argument, is that people say the media has an influence on humans now our worlds about to go down the shitter. i think its time to write like a big boy and stop breaking up your opinions into silly mini paragraphs to break up your sentences, that’s what periods are for. (Look theirs one!)So finally learn how to put together a coherent thought and back up what you say instead of merely saying “this is what i heard on the news.” Boom goes the Dynamite.

    • When you learn how to use the correct, Their, there and They’re-s, remember that I is a noun and therefore should be a capital letter and that Brackets have a space after them, perhaps you will have the grammatical authority to correct someone on their writing style.

      The mini-paragraph is a technique we use to keep the reader’s attention. Seeing as we are dealing with the unique brand of humanity known as “Morons from N4G”, we tend to need to use ever shorter paragraphs than usual. Clearly it didn’t work as you also appear to have neglected to read the article itself properly and have just made up your own mind as to what was actually written there.

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)